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Donald Pleasence

Donald Pleasence

Birthday: 5 October 1919, Worksop, Nottinghamshire, England, UK
Birth Name: Donald Henry Pleasence
Height: 168 cm

Balding, quietly-spoken, of slight build and possessed of piercing blue eyes -- often peering out from behind round, steel-rimmed glasses -- Donald Pleasence had the necessary physical attributes whic ...Show more

Donald Pleasence
[om The Flesh and the Fiends (1960)] George Rose and myself were perfectly horrible grave robbers. A Show more [om The Flesh and the Fiends (1960)] George Rose and myself were perfectly horrible grave robbers. As I recall, that film had some rather bloody scenes in it which, in 1960, was a rare occurrence in horror films. That was a really atmospheric film, and it portrayed the poverty of 19th century Europe realistically. Hide
For a while, I wore a toupee because I thought it would help me get work. But it didn't, so eventual Show more For a while, I wore a toupee because I thought it would help me get work. But it didn't, so eventually I threw it away and said, "They'll have to take me the way I am." Hide
[on THX 1138 (1971)] It was an enjoyable film to make. Even at that point, I had a feeling George Lu Show more [on THX 1138 (1971)] It was an enjoyable film to make. Even at that point, I had a feeling George Lucas would go on to do some wonderful things. Technically he knew everything about the business at a very young age. Hide
There was a sort of horror picture that I did called The Mutations (1974). I think I did that solely Show more There was a sort of horror picture that I did called The Mutations (1974). I think I did that solely for the money. I have six daughters, and they can be quite expensive, so one has to keep working and be able to pay the bills. I did get to work with Tom Baker. He's a very charming, bright man and I liked him very much. I remember that movie as a very happy time; the whole gang of us were very friendly, and that means so much when you're working together. But I surely wouldn't list that film among my proudest moments. Hide
[on Fantastic Voyage (1966)] I remember being amazed the first day I walked onto the shoot and saw t Show more [on Fantastic Voyage (1966)] I remember being amazed the first day I walked onto the shoot and saw these outsize sets that simulated the human body. I enjoyed that film because, even though my character was the villain, I got to play him as a much gentler person. Of course, he richly deserved to be swallowed by the antibodies at the end. Hide
I don't like horror films. I'm interested in them, but if there were three kinds of film playing acr Show more I don't like horror films. I'm interested in them, but if there were three kinds of film playing across the road at my local cinema, the horror film would not be the one I would go to see. I do a lot of horror films because I'm asked to do them, and I need to make money all the time, so ... Hide
[on Halloween (1978)] There are parts of the script which I couldn't accept. I believe people are be Show more [on Halloween (1978)] There are parts of the script which I couldn't accept. I believe people are behaving in a way in which they couldn't possibly in real life behave. And that's always difficult because if you're one of the people, then you are the one who's going to look like an idiot. Hide
I'm a professional actor. I get the part. I read the script. If I decide to do it, I learn the lines Show more I'm a professional actor. I get the part. I read the script. If I decide to do it, I learn the lines. I have no theory about acting. For me, there is no Method. I just do it. Hide
I don't know if I'm the first actor people think of when it comes to horror films, but I do seem to Show more I don't know if I'm the first actor people think of when it comes to horror films, but I do seem to get these calls pretty regularly. I work all the time, and it's by choice. I've got homes in Spain and France, and I do tend to have, shall we say, extravagant ways. It's nice to know that, at some point, I'll have a month off to work in my garden or be with my grandchildren. But it's equally good to know that a call might come that would take me halfway around the world to make a film. Hide
John Carpenter is the best director I ever worked with. One of the main reasons is his bravery in th Show more John Carpenter is the best director I ever worked with. One of the main reasons is his bravery in the way he's cast me in his films. By casting me as the president in Escape from New York (1981) and as the essentially good Dr. Loomis in the original Halloween (1978), he gave me the opportunities that might have been missed had I stayed a stereotypical madman. That casting against type is what made Prince of Darkness (1987) such a lovely bit of business for me. People were walking into the theaters expecting me to be bad, and I ended up representing all the good in the universe. Hide
[from an interview in 1988] Being typed as the one who constantly plays the crazy, mixed-up person i Show more [from an interview in 1988] Being typed as the one who constantly plays the crazy, mixed-up person is something I vehemently deny. I love playing the heavies, like Blofeld in You Only Live Twice (1967); they're usually larger than life and are the characters that most people remember. But as my career has progressed, more and more I'm the good guy chasing after the crazy, mixed-up people. I'm rarely the crazed monster anymore. If the truth be known, I prefer being the pursuer. If the crazed killer was the only role I was being offered, I don't know what I might do to myself. Hide
All kids love horror films. Films of that nature are especially attractive to teenagers for the simp Show more All kids love horror films. Films of that nature are especially attractive to teenagers for the simple reason that they don't want to sit home with Mom and Dad and watch game shows. Give them a film that's scary, violent, and a little bit funny and they'll be out of the house and into the theaters like a shot. Hide
I treat all film roles one way - very seriously. I treat all film roles one way - very seriously.
[from an interview done in 1989] It's gotten to the point where it's big news when I don't do a horr Show more [from an interview done in 1989] It's gotten to the point where it's big news when I don't do a horror film. At this point in my career, it doesn't bother me much that I'm probably hopelessly typecast. I like to work, and horror films definitely keep me working. Hide
[on The Great Escape (1963)] That was my first big Hollywood picture, and it struck particularly clo Show more [on The Great Escape (1963)] That was my first big Hollywood picture, and it struck particularly close to home for me because I had been in the RAF and spent some time in a POW camp in Germany. I had a wonderful part and was delighted. Steve McQueen was a bit difficult during the filming, flying in three separate screenwriters to make sure his character was to his liking. Coming from a theater background, I had a lot of qualms with the way this big budget movie was being made, but I kept my mouth shut and was ultimately very happy with the experience. Hide
Donald Pleasence's FILMOGRAPHY
as Actor (36)
Donald Pleasence Donald Pleasence'S roles
Ernst Stavro Blofeld
Ernst Stavro Blofeld

President
President

Dr. Jack Seward
Dr. Jack Seward

Priest
Priest

Lucas Deranian
Lucas Deranian

Dr. Sam Loomis
Dr. Sam Loomis

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