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Tim Roth

Tim Roth

Birthday: 14 May 1961, London, England, UK
Birth Name: Timothy Simon Smith
Height: 170 cm

Often mistaken for an American because of his skill at imitating accents, actor Tim Roth was born Simon Timothy Roth on May 14, 1961 in Lambeth, London, England. His mother, Ann, was a teacher and lan ...Show More

Tim Roth
[on the Planet of the Apes (1968) films] I was too young to grasp what the series meant to a lot of Show more [on the Planet of the Apes (1968) films] I was too young to grasp what the series meant to a lot of people. Certainly coming to America has been extraordinary. People have been a bit leery of [the 2001 version.] People take [the 1968 version] seriously and people are very fond of it so they want to make sure that you did a good job. Hide
[on Planet of the Apes (2001)] They gave me a script after I said yes. It took me about 10 seconds. Show more [on Planet of the Apes (2001)] They gave me a script after I said yes. It took me about 10 seconds. I answered the phone and was like, "Tim Burton? Yes." Then they gave me script and I read it. I didn't think the character was going to have any balls in the end. So I talked to Tim and asked him, "Can I do this kind of stuff?" I would get the pages in the morning and just learn them then. Then I would work with Tim [on the direction]. Hide
I think every director has a different take. Some are good, some are bad. The directors you get on b Show more I think every director has a different take. Some are good, some are bad. The directors you get on best with sometimes don't make the best films. So who's to say who is right? Hide
I have incredible stage fright. It's awful. Filming holds no fear for me. It's just where I live. I have incredible stage fright. It's awful. Filming holds no fear for me. It's just where I live.
[on how his relationship with Quentin Tarantino came to be] Well, he came to me. He'd seen Rosencran Show more [on how his relationship with Quentin Tarantino came to be] Well, he came to me. He'd seen Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead (1990) and Vincent & Theo (1990), which are films he really liked. My agent sent me the script, and wrote a little note saying I should look at the role of Pink or Blonde. And I read it and I said "No, I like that guy Orange, because he's a liar. I'll be an Englishman playing an American playing a cop who's playing a villain." And I liked that combination, because it seemed incredibly difficult to do. So then I met with Quentin and we got along very well, but they wanted me to read, and I wouldn't do it. I don't like auditioning in that way, because I'm not very good at it. But we all got drunk, and eventually I did. We became very fast friends. We worked very hard and very closely together, and then he wrote Honey Bunny and Pumpkin for me and Amanda [Amanda Plummer] to do together in [Pulp Fiction (1994)]. And then Four Rooms (1995) came about because Steve Buscemi couldn't do it, I think. They came to me and asked, "Would you fancy having a crack at this guy?" And I thought, "Yeah, I'll have a go, wild." And from there we did talk for a long time about Inglourious Basterds (2009), but with the TV show, the schedule just got in the way in the end, so I couldn't do it. I was ready, though, to go out to Germany with him. Working with Quentin, you just hit the ground running. It's a hell of a ride, but it's always phenomenal. Really, I owe him, because I suppose he's the guy who got me noticed in the States, which is where I've been living now for the best part of 20 years. Hide
I've never really played a goody in the traditional sense. Anyway, I don't think that I look the par Show more I've never really played a goody in the traditional sense. Anyway, I don't think that I look the part of a heroic character, especially not in Hollywood, so they never really come up. On a childish level, villains are just more fun. Hide
[on Reservoir Dogs (1992)] There's a lot of blood in that film. I think there's only nine pints in a Show more [on Reservoir Dogs (1992)] There's a lot of blood in that film. I think there's only nine pints in a body; we had about four gallons. Hide
[on Planet of the Apes (2001)] I kept working on being an ape all the way through. I just kept pushi Show more [on Planet of the Apes (2001)] I kept working on being an ape all the way through. I just kept pushing it and trying to invent new movements. One of the guys who worked at the Ape School became my stunt double so we just kept working on different things and just play around. Hide
People remember villians. Sometimes in an action movie or sci-fi movie, being a villain is actually Show more People remember villians. Sometimes in an action movie or sci-fi movie, being a villain is actually kind of interesting. Hide
Americans have bought - lock, stock and barrel - the Jeremy Irons - Kenneth Branagh England. And it' Show more Americans have bought - lock, stock and barrel - the Jeremy Irons - Kenneth Branagh England. And it's fake. It's an absolute con. Merchant-Ivory? Bollocks! Hide
[on the ending of Planet of the Apes (2001)] I cannot explain that ending. I have seen it twice and Show more [on the ending of Planet of the Apes (2001)] I cannot explain that ending. I have seen it twice and I don't understand anything. Hide
There's stuff I'm really scared of doing that I think I *should* do. I *should* do some Shakespeare Show more There's stuff I'm really scared of doing that I think I *should* do. I *should* do some Shakespeare but it terrifies me. I want to... Harold Pinter adapted King Lear for me - into a film - and I want to try and make that at some point, but, you know, it's damned hard finding money for Shakespeare if you're not Kenneth Branagh, you know? Hide
[on General Thade's temper in Planet of the Apes (2001)] I remember that from a documentary series. Show more [on General Thade's temper in Planet of the Apes (2001)] I remember that from a documentary series. When they charge you, when they fight, they go insane. And then you're gone. It's over. They are very vicious at times. Hide
[on Gridlock'd (1997) co-star Tupac Shakur] I found him to be incredibly talented. I used to call hi Show more [on Gridlock'd (1997) co-star Tupac Shakur] I found him to be incredibly talented. I used to call him "New Money" because he had a massive Bentley and a different model sat in the car each day, and he used to call me "Free Shit" because I always used to get loads of free stuff from companies. It's a shame what happened - I think he could have gone on to be quite something as an actor. Hide
I have a bad time between jobs because I'm always convinced I'll never work again. I think it may be Show more I have a bad time between jobs because I'm always convinced I'll never work again. I think it may be an English thing, this fear of unemployment. Hide
[on working with Charlton Heston] It was very difficult for me. On one level, there's the man and he Show more [on working with Charlton Heston] It was very difficult for me. On one level, there's the man and he's my dad. But on the other level, the whole NRA thing is what it is now. I'm so against it, very vocally so. But it was inappropriate for the workplace. If I'm going to talk to him, I'll talk to him outside the workplace. So it was just two guys in makeup doing a scene. Hide
[on working with Charlton Heston] I was contracted so I couldn't get out of it. I feel very strongly Show more [on working with Charlton Heston] I was contracted so I couldn't get out of it. I feel very strongly about that monster. I made my feelings clear on set but got myself in make-up and put my gear on - including rubber hands so I wouldn't be infected if I touched him - and went in. We did the scene and I promptly left. Hide
There is less pressure on a character actor. It generally means that you will be acting for all of y Show more There is less pressure on a character actor. It generally means that you will be acting for all of your life, which is my intention. It is not my intention to be a rich and famous person. That would be pretty boring. Hide
[on what drew him to Lie to Me (2009)] It's like an experiment for me. I've done telly before. I've Show more [on what drew him to Lie to Me (2009)] It's like an experiment for me. I've done telly before. I've done films for TV, and miniseries. But I've never done anything like this. When they first came to me, I thought the character was really interesting, and I thought we could go in different directions, and it wouldn't be just a procedural. The character I thought was potentially quite wild and fun. But I wasn't sure if I wanted to settle into something like this, so I walked away from it initially, until [creator] Sam Baum came back to me for another run, and I took him more seriously. My kids were all about to hit the teen age, and I'd heard that as much as you're not around when you're doing TV, you do get to go home. You're there at the weekend. You get to see your guys growing up. It was a chance to be around for that last chunk of childhood. So I got into it. Then we got picked up, which was great, but I wasn't sure it would succeed, if it would engage an audience on the kind of scale network television requires. But it seems to be working. And I've really started to enjoy it. It's a very interesting experience, being involved in television. American television is very, very odd. And it will go on for as long as it goes on, but from my end, it's been this grand and bizarre experiment. I like playing the guy, and he's changing all the time. And they're writing good character stuff now this season. So hopefully he'll evolve and become even more mad. I think American TV is probably some of the best TV out there at the moment. But network TV is a whole different animal. Basically, we have to turn in, every eight or nine days, a little 43-minute film with a certain amount of twists in it, and it's quite a beast. You are completely in the hands of your writers and the talent of the people at the top. For me, it really was this weird test to see if I could find my way through it. It's a very strange world, but it's quite nice being a part of it. Hide
Bring back dueling, I say. Drive-by sword fight. Bring back dueling, I say. Drive-by sword fight.
I'm not a method actor. I don't really have to go live in a hut in the tundra to play an accountant. Show more I'm not a method actor. I don't really have to go live in a hut in the tundra to play an accountant. People tell you that's what you should do because it's what De Niro does. It never worked for me. I've always been able to learn what I need to learn from the script. Hide
[on making Youth Without Youth (2007)] All in all, it was an extraordinary journey. It was 90 days, Show more [on making Youth Without Youth (2007)] All in all, it was an extraordinary journey. It was 90 days, I think, pretty much in Romania. I think I had one day off. And I think I made sure I switched my phone off so no one could get to me. It was very, very difficult, but incredibly worthwhile. We made it for a very small amount of money. It was a very low-budget movie. Hide
Funny Games (2007) was one of the toughest things I've ever done, on many levels. Firstly, the direc Show more Funny Games (2007) was one of the toughest things I've ever done, on many levels. Firstly, the director [Michael Haneke], I thought was wonderful. He's a fantastic man. But we were remaking a film that had already been done, and he wanted to remake it shot-for-shot. There was no real room for maneuvering, and for playing with or experimenting with the character. You pretty much had to be where the other actor sat or stood and not play around with the lines at all. That was part of this weird experiment he was doing. And it was shot in sequence. So you started in the morning distressed, and you ended your day even more distressed, and then you got up in the morning and you started more distressed and you ended up even more distressed, on-and-on for five and a half weeks. It was absolutely brutal, but it was a hell of a journey. Hide
[on attending the Academy Awards ceremony] Like going to Liberace's house on acid. [on attending the Academy Awards ceremony] Like going to Liberace's house on acid.
I remember watching The Sex Pistols on TV when I came home from school - I think it was Johnny Rotte Show more I remember watching The Sex Pistols on TV when I came home from school - I think it was Johnny Rotten and Siouxsie Sioux from the Banshees - and they started swearing and the guy interviewing them got fired for provoking them. It was a wonderful time. It was like saying, 'Ugly is beautiful, everything you're taught us is wrong.' Hide
Every film you make as an actor, it's not yours, it's the director's. Every film you make as an actor, it's not yours, it's the director's.
[on acting in ape makeup in Planet of the Apes (2001)] In a sense, it does work for you. You can tak Show more [on acting in ape makeup in Planet of the Apes (2001)] In a sense, it does work for you. You can take on the problems of the makeup and use them to your advantage. I was always working against the costume, it was compressing me all the time, so I used it to make my movements a little more liquid. The process became depressing and exhausting. It was quite a long shoot. Although I wasn't on every day, it still takes it out of you. But once you're in the role and the cameras start rolling, it's fun. I forget about the makeup. The makeup and costumes actually help me. Hide
[on Tim Burton] He creates this bizarre, twisted, odd, nuts kind of worlds and you can't put your fi Show more [on Tim Burton] He creates this bizarre, twisted, odd, nuts kind of worlds and you can't put your finger on them. They're always kind of glorious and enduring as well. You just want to be a part of it. Hide
(On turning down Four Weddings and a Funeral (1994)) "They sent me the script. I don't know if that Show more (On turning down Four Weddings and a Funeral (1994)) "They sent me the script. I don't know if that was the director's intention, obviously not! It was not something that appealed to me. Phoebe Cates was going to do it and wanted me to do it with her. I like Phoebe. She's a great comedienne. But it all turned around." Hide
Tim Roth's FILMOGRAPHY
as Actor (69)
Tim Roth Tim Roth'S roles
Ted the Bellhop
Ted the Bellhop

Dr. Cal Lightman
Dr. Cal Lightman

Pumpkin
Pumpkin

Thade
Thade

Vincent Van Gogh
Vincent Van Gogh

Det. Michael Bryer
Det. Michael Bryer

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